Contact Information: Kathy Kieffer, Promotion and Web Contact  4864 Smiley Rd  Chapel Hill, TN 37034 (931) 703-0239 South Central Katahdin Association South Central Katahdin Association Email Email
Katahdin are a breed a hair sheep developed in the United States. They originated at the Piel Farm in north central Maine where Michael Piel was an innovator and "amateur geneticist". He began making inquiries about hair sheep after seeing pictures in a National Geographic of West African hair sheep which he would later import for crossbreeding. He mixed Cheviots, Suffolks (with the help of LSU), and many others to try and produce the lamb he was looking for. In the early 1970s, Piel felt he had come close to his goal of a "meat sheep that did not require shearing." He called them Katahdin sheep after Mt. Katahdin, the highest peak in Maine. In October 1975, Piel imported a handful of Wiltshire Horn sheep from Wales via Canada. The first crosses were born in 1976. The crossing continued even after his death in December of 1976 with Barbara Piel. Paul and Margaret Jepson of Vermont were looking for Wiltshire Horn Stock in the 1970's and after getting acquainted with the Piels, decided the Katahdins would suit them better. Their flock became the first satellite flock away from the Piel farm. Interest in Katahdins grew and by 2008, the Katahdin Hair Sheep International which was incorporated in 1985, had registered over 75,000 sheep in North America with over 500 members. 

History of the

Katahdin Hair Sheep

Breed

2016 SCKA Annual Meeting

The South Central Katahdin Association gathered in Chapel Hill, TN, for their Annual Meeting August 2 and 3, hosted by Caney Creek Farms. Tuesday night was known for the three F’s: Fellowship, Fun and a Farm Tour. We had 75 in attendance with 11 states represented: Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. Mark Dennis did a hoof trimming demonstration before supper. The Annual Meeting on Wednesday had 52 in attendance. Dr. Jennifer Hatcher, D.V. M. spoke to us about the new feed directive. Brandon and Amy Tavalin of Tavalin Tails spoke to us about marketing and CSA’s. They told us of the importance of marketing sheep with social media. SCKA membership voted to go to the Sheep and Goat Buying Station in Hope, Arkansas, June 9 and 10, 2017, with Jesse Duckett and Chris Sweat hosting. The Association also voted to fund the t- shirts for the Dr. Leroy Boyd Junior Show exhibitors at Sedalia, MO next year. Meeting adjourned.

2016 PRESIDENT'S

CORNER

Hello from the South Central Katahdin Hair Sheep Association. I know that everyone is tired and worn out with all that lambing season brings: late nights, really early mornings, make raising Katahdins something you have to love to do. Spring has arrived and this always helps to lighten the load. Some of you may just be started lambing, but the rewards will be great so hang in there! I think spring is a good time to reevaluate our flocks. We have many new breeders which increases the number of Katahdins available for sale. With the number of top breeders out there today we need to be very strict when it comes to culling. There is no need to keep problem sheep. We need to watch our hair coats, feet and leg problems, prolapse issues and any other qualities that lessen the value of our sheep. We need to sale our bottom end sheep for slaughter and purchase top individuals to replace them and support the breed. I think for our breed to continue to improve (and what an improvement we have already made) we need to get rid our problem sheep. If you are able to attend our breed sales and support them this will help keep our prices up and promote the breed also. The Midwest Sale is coming up in June and is a good place to find top quality sheep. Also the South Central Katahdin Hair Sheep Association will have a private treaty sale at the beginning of August (August 2&3) and the annual KHSI meeting and sale will be August 5 & 6 in Cookeville , TN. Start making plans today to support these great Katahdin events. We hope to see you there! Kenneth Jessee, SCKA President

2017 Director’s Notes

Hi Everyone, I hope everyone had a great lambing season and are moving on to selling lambs and growing replacements. (P.S.) don’t forget to cull.. The Midwest Stud Ram show and Sale is coming up soon in Sedalia, MO. If you have never been, you should try to make arrangements to attend. It is truly amazing to see every breed of sheep in one place. The Leroy Boyd Show is Monday, June 19, 2017, at 9:00 am. I can’t wait to see the t-shirts that SCKA donated. The Katahdin Show is Tuesday, June 20, at 8:00 am. and the Sale is Thursday, June 22, at 8:00 am in the Sheep Barn. Next, I hope everyone is making arrangements to come to the 18th SCKA Annual Meeting and Private Treaty Sale, June 9 & 10, 2017, in Hope, Arkansas, hosted by Jesse Duckett and Chris Sweat. They have a great lineup of speakers coming. (See full Agenda on front Page).That’s all for now! See ewe soon, Kathy
SCKA brochure - South Central Katahdin Association
South Central Katahdin Association South Central Katahdin Association Email Contact Information: Kathy Kieffer, Promotion and Web Contact  4864 Smiley Rd  Chapel Hill, TN 37034  (931) 703-0239 Email
Katahdin are a breed a hair sheep developed in the United States. They originated at the Piel Farm in north central Maine where Michael Piel was an innovator and "amateur geneticist". He began making inquiries about hair sheep after seeing pictures in a National Geographic of West African hair sheep which he would later import for crossbreeding. He mixed Cheviots, Suffolks (with the help of LSU), and many others to try and produce the lamb he was looking for. In the early 1970s, Piel felt he had come close to his goal of a "meat sheep that did not require shearing." He called them Katahdin sheep after Mt. Katahdin, the highest peak in Maine. In October 1975, Piel imported a handful of Wiltshire Horn sheep from Wales via Canada. The first crosses were born in 1976. The crossing continued even after his death in December of 1976 with Barbara Piel. Paul and Margaret Jepson of Vermont were looking for Wiltshire Horn Stock in the 1970's and after getting acquainted with the Piels, decided the Katahdins would suit them better. Their flock became the first satellite flock away from the Piel farm. Interest in Katahdins grew and by 2008, the Katahdin Hair Sheep International which was incorporated in 1985, had registered over 75,000 sheep in North America with over 500 members. 

History of the Katahdin Hair Sheep Breed

2016 SCKA Annual Meeting

The South Central Katahdin Association gathered in Chapel Hill, TN, for their Annual Meeting August 2 and 3, hosted by Caney Creek Farms. Tuesday night was known for the three F’s: Fellowship, Fun and a Farm Tour. We had 75 in attendance with 11 states represented: Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. Mark Dennis did a hoof trimming demonstration before supper. The Annual Meeting on Wednesday had 52 in attendance. Dr. Jennifer Hatcher, D.V. M. spoke to us about the new feed directive. Brandon and Amy Tavalin of Tavalin Tails spoke to us about marketing and CSA’s. They told us of the importance of marketing sheep with social media. SCKA membership voted to go to the Sheep and Goat Buying Station in Hope, Arkansas, June 9 and 10, 2017, with Jesse Duckett and Chris Sweat hosting. The Association also voted to fund the t-shirts for the Dr. Leroy Boyd Junior Show exhibitors at Sedalia, MO next year. Meeting adjourned.

2016 PRESIDENT'S CORNER

Hello from the South Central Katahdin Hair Sheep Association. I know that everyone is tired and worn out with all that lambing season brings: late nights, really early mornings, make raising Katahdins something you have to love to do. Spring has arrived and this always helps to lighten the load. Some of you may just be started lambing, but the rewards will be great so hang in there! I think spring is a good time to reevaluate our flocks. We have many new breeders which increases the number of Katahdins available for sale. With the number of top breeders out there today we need to be very strict when it comes to culling. There is no need to keep problem sheep. We need to watch our hair coats, feet and leg problems, prolapse issues and any other qualities that lessen the value of our sheep. We need to sale our bottom end sheep for slaughter and purchase top individuals to replace them and support the breed. I think for our breed to continue to improve (and what an improvement we have already made) we need to get rid our problem sheep. If you are able to attend our breed sales and support them this will help keep our prices up and promote the breed also. The Midwest Sale is coming up in June and is a good place to find top quality sheep. Also the South Central Katahdin Hair Sheep Association will have a private treaty sale at the beginning of August (August 2&3) and the annual KHSI meeting and sale will be August 5 & 6 in Cookeville , TN. Start making plans today to support these great Katahdin events. We hope to see you there! Kenneth Jessee, SCKA President

2017 Director’s Notes

Hi Everyone, I hope everyone had a great lambing season and are moving on to selling lambs and growing replacements. (P.S.) don’t forget to cull.. The Midwest Stud Ram show and Sale is coming up soon in Sedalia, MO. If you have never been, you should try to make arrangements to attend. It is truly amazing to see every breed of sheep in one place. The Leroy Boyd Show is Monday, June 19, 2017, at 9:00 am. I can’t wait to see the t-shirts that SCKA donated. The Katahdin Show is Tuesday, June 20, at 8:00 am. and the Sale is Thursday, June 22, at 8:00 am in the Sheep Barn. Next, I hope everyone is making arrangements to come to the 18th SCKA Annual Meeting and Private Treaty Sale, June 9 & 10, 2017, in Hope, Arkansas, hosted by Jesse Duckett and Chris Sweat. They have a great lineup of speakers coming. (See full Agenda on front Page).That’s all for now! See ewe soon, Kathy
SCKA brochure - South Central Katahdin Association